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No Butts campaign

Here at Fareham Men's Shed we do try to encourage our members to take health issues seriously and “open up”. This could just be an informal chat with other members like has anyone ever.......??? or better still try and get to talk to a doctor.

We often raise this at open meetings and have achieved success with a few members who have been experiencing issues but done nothing to seek help.

It is a fact that woman are far better at discussing health issues openly and there fore have a better chance of cure. Early diagnoses of all issues offer more options of treatment, faster recovery and a higher chance of a full recovery.

So let's talk about the BIG “C”. May has been dedicated to bowel cancer with the No Butts campaign. Look out for:-

  • Blood in your poo or from your bottom
  • Obvious change in bowel habits
  • Weight loss you can not explain
  • Extreme tiredness for no apparent reason
  • Lump and or pain in your tummy

We thought we would state a few facts. You will probably have heard some of this before but it is always worth reading it again! Many people believe that cancer is just “bad luck”or “Fate” ! The truth is only about 5 – 10% of all cancers result from specific inherited genes. Most cancers are preventable by lifestyle. Here are two important and easy things to achieve. Maintain a healthy weight, your waist measurement should not be more than half of your height!! Have regular exercise like a daily walk, play golf or join the local gym, even gardening is a form of exercise but it is not enough on it's own.

Being physically active reduces the risk of breast, womb and BOWEL caner and this is FACT! (Well maybe not cancer of the womb in our case).

There is strong evidence that eating processed meat and a higher consumption of red meat increases your risk of bowel cancer! Red meat is a good source of nutrients and protein so can form part of a balanced diet. Eat as little as possible of processed meat like, bacon, sausages and ham. These are often high in fat and salt so can also increase the risk of developing high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease as well! Most of us enjoy a “full English” but have it as a treat now and then, not as the norm!

Eat plenty of vegetables, fruit, wholegrains and pulses. Eat fish twice a week and try going meat fee at least once a week.

REMEMBER! It is never to late to change your lifestyle, it will make a difference!

Men's Shed Charter

The UKMSA have launced a Charter to Save Lives. Our Shed was asked to try and get a press release in the local papers. Chris H did his best but to no avail. For information this is the press release that he asked to be published:

Fareham Men's Shed joins Men’s Sheds across the UK to Save Lives

Fareham Men's Shed joins the UK Men’s Sheds Association on 3rd March as it launches the Charter for well-being in craft and DIY. The Charter has been developed to encourage people and companies working across the DIY, Craft and Hobbies Sector to come together to both promote men's well-being and encourage them to get involved with groups such as Men’s Sheds.

Chairman Peter Raven said “Our Shed is tremendously proud to support this Charter. It is a national campaign to promote men’s health and allows us to connect to new groups and hopefully bring more people to join us”.

Supporting our members

When you belong to a men's shed you have an army of friends ready to help and support you. A long-standing and very active member became unwell during the lockdown and was unable to manage the step down into his front porch. A team of three shedders visited him and installed a raised floor so that he could get outside again. He told his family that the best thing he had done since he lost his wife was to join his local Men's Shed.

The pandemics of anxiety, depression and loneliness have preceded Covid and continue to grow with devastating impact on our society. Although these do not discriminate across gender, race or geography, the reality is that there is a greater impact on men in particular as a result of how they engage with society, and men are four more times more likely to die by suicide than women.Men’s Sheds save lives, reduce anxiety, depression and loneliness, at the same time they are creating incredible things.

“Men’s Sheds serve men so it is vitally important that we particularly champion men’s health.’ said Charlie Bethel, Chief Officer of UK Men’s Sheds Association.

The Charter is being launched at the House of Commons and hopes to bring together organisations and companies across the DIY and Craft sectors with the third sector and Men’s Sheds to identify bespoke programmes to support the wellbeing of customers, staff and the general public.

On attending a Shed, members report:

  • 96% felt less lonely
  • 89% were not as depressed
  • 75% had decreased anxiety
  • 97% made more friends
  • 88% felt more connected to the community

For more information on the Charter and UK Men’s Sheds Association visit www.menssheds.org.uk or email admin@ukmsa.org.uk or telephone 0300 772 9626.

Find out more information about our local Shed at www.farehammensshed.org.uk

Social Prescribing

social prescribing logo Fareham & Portchester Primary Care Network

Social Prescribing can improve your health and wellbeing.
Social Prescribing helps you to find out about services and other non-medical support to improve your mental and physical health, sense of wellness and independence. This service is available in your GP surgery through Fareham and Portchester Primary Care Network.

How does it work?
You can ask to have an appointment with a Social Prescriber or a member of your GP practice can refer you to the service.. A Social Prescriber will contact you by phone to discuss your referral and they may come and see you at home, invite you to come and meet them at the GP practice or arrange to meet you elsewhere. This will usually be within 7 working days.

A Social Prescriber is:

  • Someone to talk to in confidence.
  • Someone who is practical, helpful and will not judge you.
  • Someone who can help you find activities that may suit you and if needed can go with you to try them out.
  • Someone who can help you decide what you would like to do to feel healthier and happier.
  • Someone who can help you make appointments and access support for form filling and similar.
  • Someone who will give you support along the way.

Social Prescribers can look for services in your community such as:

  • Befriending and social clubs.
  • Counselling and support groups.
  • Volunteering, training and employment opportunities.
  • Access to specialist services.
  • Opportunities for education and learning.
  • Help to lead a healthier and more active lifestyle.
  • Ways to develop your own skills and interests.

Your Social Prescribers are:

  • Ann Mitchell: Fareham Centre Practice
  • Jennie Romicheva: Gudge Heath Lane Surgery
  • Marie Adams: Westlands Medical Centre
  • Karen Grimsdale: Portchester Health Centre
  • Contact us via your GP surgery or email: fgccg.social.prescribers@nhs.net

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